Branding a Farm

Click this image to view the full Wildroot Cove Branding Board

We started our homestead because we love this lifestyle, not because we were after an extra source of income. The purpose of running a business from Wildroot Cove is to help sustain what we have. At the size we are currently at, the cost of goat and chicken husbandry exceeds the amount of money we make from these animals. That could possibly change in the future as we grow and can offer more products.

Since living a sustainable life is costly, we are strategic about coming up with products and services that we could sell that would also benefit the community. I have found that people genuinely feel great about supporting our business because they see the care our animals get from the proceeds.

Branding your business

As a graphic designer, I believe one of the first steps in starting a successful business is to create an identity for it. An identity typically starts with a logo, however, branding is an all-encompassing style (i.e. business cards, letterhead, how the products are packaged, social media posts, etc.).

Entrepreneur.com says, “your brand is your promise to your customer. It tells them what they can expect from your products and services, and it differentiates your offering from that of your competitors. Your brand is derived from who you are, who you want to be and who people perceive you to be... the foundation of your brand is your logo.”

Here are my 5 tips for a logo design

1. Less is more

When choosing a logo, keep it clean, simple and easy to read. You may have horses, sheep, goats, chickens, pigs and produce, but that doesn’t mean all of that should be represented in the logo. It might be best to go with a simple logo that doesn’t have any specifics than to try to fit all these elements in. Also consider that homesteads are always growing and you might add something to your business that later on won’t be represented in the logo.

2. Fonts matter

I believe people react more to fonts than they do graphics. When you are narrowing down fonts for your logo, I suggest showing three different people to get a variety of opinions, which also brings me to my next point.

3. Think of your audience

If you make all your business choices off of what you like, then you’re narrowing your audience to people who fit your mold. Think about men and women, young and old, married and single, homesteaders and city-folk. You did not work this hard to create a product or service just for you.

4. Usable in a variety of formats

When choosing a logo, consider all the ways you might use it. Farm signs, stickers, postcards, packaging, apparel, business cards, letterhead, etc. You might have already learned this when you have tried fitting your horizontal logo in the round social media profile image. Here are a few ways we have used our branding so far. It is not a one-size-fits-all, no matter the need, we have a design that will fit that meets our branding requirements.

5. Invest in your business

If creativity is not your jam, hire someone. You want your logo to set you apart, to relate to your customers, o be inviting all while communicating a clear and concise message. The end result might be a simplistic-style logo that you think, “I could have done this myself,” however the strategy involved to get that end result is worth hiring for.

When you invest in the branding, it truly shows your customers that you care about the details. A professional graphic designer will be sure to include all the high quality design files you would need for any type of printing or web use.


Graphic Design Services

If you are interested, send me a message and I can give you a quote for my branding packages and can help your farm business identify with you who are as the business owner and relate to your customers. If you would like advice with your logo and branding, reach out and I’ll be glad to give you my feedback.

I created these design templates for no reason, other than to get my creativity on. I am willing to sell them at a discounted price (only one client per design).